SERGEI EISENSTEIN'S MEXICAN FOOTAGE
Dance of the Heads & Day of the Dead

by Grigory ALEXANDROV & Sergueï Mikhaïlovitch EISENSTEIN & Edward TISSÉ
1931 / 35mm / b&w / silent / 1S / 10' 55

Upon Charlie Chaplin’s recommendation, Sergei Eisenstein connected with writer Upton Sinclair, who helped establish the means for Eisenstein to embark on a film project in Mexico in late 1930. Accompanied by longtime collaborators Grigory Alexandrov and Edward Tissé, he shot dozens of hours of footage for what he planned as a multi-chapter film titled ¡QUE VIVA MEXICO! Funds from the Mexican Film Trust - a production company established by Sinclair, his wife, and other investors - were soon exhausted, and Eisenstein’s chances of finishing the film himself further diminished as his re-entry visa to the United States expired and he was unable to secure an extension to his permission to remain away from the Soviet Union. Much of the footage was brought back to the US by the producers, and Eisenstein never completed his work.
"Eisenstein intended to make a film symphony, a film serape or Diego Rivera Mural of the seventh art. 'I wanted to show a timeless Mexico where the past was merged with the present'; but the shooting stopped abruptly because the funding was cut, and although they promised to send the material, never received it and he died without being able to conclude with his own hands one of his great works." - Oswaldo Betancourt 

1 PRINT IN DISTRIBUTION


distribution format Digital file on server (HD)
screen 16/9 (single screen)
speed 24 fps
sound silent
rental fee 40,00 €